Events

Films

Da myndighederne sagde stop And the Authorities Said Stop
Da myndighederne sagde stop

And the Authorities Said Stop

Dir. Per Kirkeby, Aqqaluk Lynge

  • Original title: Nalagkersuissut okarput tassagok
  • 1972
  • 92mins
  • Greenlandic with Danish Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 28/8/2014 7PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 19/9/2014 7PM
    The screening is followed by a Q&A with directors Aqqaluk Lynge & Per Kirkeby.

When the coal mine of Qutdligssat is closed, the mine workers not only lose their jobs, a cityof 2000 inhabitants is totally deprived of its livelihood. The people have to move, they areleaving in order to be resettled. The film follows the widowed miner Lase and his six children when they move from Qutdligssat to a new home in Frederikshåb where Lase has found work at a fish factory. Tales of suffering are interwoven between long shots reflecting the daily life of a troublesome, desperate situation. There is a sense of despair but also a growing awareness of wrongdoings and vested economic interests.
Director Aggaluq Lynge when onto to become a famous Greenlandic politician whilst co-director Per Kirkeby spent a lot of time in Greenland as a young geologist and a film-maker. The movie is the first film which was made on a Greenlandic premise and it is considered one of the cultural catalysts, which sparked today’s quest for independence. – Robert Monk, 2014

Aningaaq Aningaaq  
Aningaaq

Aningaaq

Dir. Jonás Cuaron

  • 2013
  • 7 Min
  • Greenlandic with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 1/9/2014 7PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 21/9/2014 7:15PM
  • (FO) Torshavn, Nordic House 7/10/2014 9PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 31/10/2014 8PM
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 21/11/2014 8PM
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 17/12/2014 8PM

This short companion piece to the Hollywood movie event of the year is a touching and thought provoking study of how life continues within even the harshest of climates. Focusing on Dr Ryan Stone’s (Sandra Bullock) confused distress two-way radio message with Innuit fisherman Aningaaq (Orto Ignatiussen), the film shows the flipside of the blockbuster Gravity’s themes of human interaction and survival. Even though the Greenlander speaks no English, the stranded astronaut is able to carry out a conversation of sorts through sounds and expression.
The pure white of the arctic landscape is captured in stunning definition, as Aningaaq explains something of his daily struggle. When the fisherman’s baby’s cries are heard, it become clear to Stone and the audience that life does indeed go on. – Robert Monk, 2013

Arfernat Arfernat (The Sixth)
Arfernat

Arfernat

Dir. Rune Bundgaard and Martin Svinkløv

  • 2014
  • 77mins
  • Greenlandic with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 30/8/2014 9PM
    Q&A with directors Rune Bundgaard and Martin Svinkløv.
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 20/9/2014 7:15PM
    Q&A with directors Rune Bundgaard and Martin Svinkløv.
  • (FO) Torshavn, Nordic House 1/11/2014 6PM
    Q&A with directors Rune Bundgaard and Martin Svinkløv.
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 1/11/2014 6PM
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 23/11/2014 8PM
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 13/12/2014 5PM

Arfernat is a documentary about a young musher, Ove Johansen, from the small village of Ilimanaq. He has inherited a dog sled team from his father, and bound by tradition, he must participate in his first major race, the Avannaata Qimusersua. Through Ove’s preparation and experiences for and during the big race, the film offers a glimpse into North Greenlandic mentality and the cultural significance of dog sledding.
In recent years the number of sled dogs has decreased significantly in Northern Greenland and during the filmmaking process, it became clear how essential dog sled racing is to the Greenlandic identity. It ends up being a process through which the students demonstrate how “one of their own” carries on a historic tradition that might otherwise be forgotten.
The film is not only about sled racing, but also the special warmth and solidarity among the people that the directors met during their three year period teaching in the village.
Both directors were teachers at the Villads Villadsen Boarding School in Qasigiannguit and the film began life as a media class project whereby the students were directly involved in the process in both the production side and in the recorded interviewing of the villagers. – Robert Monk, 2014

Before Tomorrow Before Tomorrow
Before Tomorrow

Before Tomorrow

Dir. Madeline Ivalu & Marie-Hélène Cousineau

  • 2008
  • 93 mins
  • Inuktitut with English Subtitles
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 21/9/2014 7:15PM
  • (FI) Inari, Saamelaiskulttuurikeskus Sajos 24/11/2014 8PM

Based upon a book by Danish author Jørn Riel set in Greenland, the filmatisation takes place in a small Inuit community in the Nunavik region of northern Quebec in the 1840s, the film stars Madeline Ivalu as Ninioq, an Inuk elder isolated with her grandson Maniq (Paul Dylan Ivalu) after most of their community perishes from smallpox transmitted by strange traders. -
Robert Monk, 2014

Blok P Blok P
Blok P

Blok P

Dir. Rikke Diemer & Peter Jensen

  • 2014
  • 35mins
  • Greenlandic with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 1/9/2014 7PM
    Q&A with co-director Peter Jensen.
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 23/9/2014 4:30PM
  • (FO) Torshavn, Nordic House 7/10/2014 7PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 1/11/2014 6PM
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 24/11/2014 6PM
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 16/12/2014 6PM

Detailing the construction and destruction of Greenland’s largest ever residential housing block, this documentary film takes a studied look at the cultivation and sustainment of community living.
Set around the memories and reminiscing of life in Blok P in Nuuk, the film offers an effective piecing together of the building’s rise and fall. Using the personal narratives and reflections from some of Blok P’s original inhabitants, the film marks an artistic illustration of the life and times of the modern urban setting. Reflecting an almost futuristic look for the Greenland of the time, Blok P’s (1965-2010) life is celebrated and looked back on in varying degrees of warmth and interest.
The filmmakers attempt to uncover exactly how this promising new dawn for Greenlandic city living went from being an attractive sign of progress to becoming in one commentator’s words “so depressing it’s almost an attraction in itself.” At one point containing 1% of the entire country’s population, Blok P was something of a grand project for the mid-1960s. While not without its considerable faults – the perceived segregation of native Greenlanders and off-country business leaders’ families being one major one – life within the complex is remembered by the families that lived there with no small degree of affection and insight.
The contrasting reflections of the past with the gritty reality of the building’s final 21st Century years are bullet pointed by a clever use of musical styles. Classical strings highlight the glowing memories of family and community togetherness, while a wholly more urban approach is brought about through the use of local hip-hop and rap. – Robert Monk, 2014

Books with Remoulade Books with Remoulade
 
Books with Remoulade

Books with Remoulade

Dir. Halla Mía

  • 2013
  • 32mins
  • Danish/Greenlandic with English subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 2/9/2014 9PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 3/11/2014 6PM
    Q&A with director Halla Mia

Offering a look inside the Neriusaaq bookshop and cafe in Tasiilaq, East Greenland, Books With Remoulade is an entertaining short hosted by the engaging figure of Gerda Villholm. Villholm happens to be a transsexual, but the film makes no mention of this. It has no bearing on the everyday life of the popular town institution.
Serving up a real slice of life to go along with the herbal ice cream and pizza, the realities of a small business in a small town are touched upon with a smile. As Gerda herself imparts, “it’s my life”. The ambition to mean something to the local community as a whole certainly seems to have been fulfilled, with the film capturing the social aspect of the shop with a poignant calm.
Putting the wishes of her customers well above the doubts of her bank manager, Gerda is presented as a warm-hearted individual with a flair for making people feel welcome. The structure of the film brings this good-nature out into the locality, with well-composed shots of the townsfolk flitting in and out of the shop – and in out of its owner’s amiable life. – Robert Monk, 2014

Echoes ECHOES
 
Echoes

ECHOES

Dir. Ivalo Frank

  • 2010
  • 24mins
  • English with Danish/English/Greenlandic subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 2/9/2014 9PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 24/9/2014 4:30PM
    Q&A with director Ivalo Frank.
  • (FO) Torshavn, Nordic House 6/10/2014 7PM
    Q&A with director Ivalo Frank.
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 2/11/2014 6PM
    Q&A with director Ivalo Frank.
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 22/11/2014 11AM
    Q&A with director Ivalo Frank.
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 14/12/2014 6PM
    Q&A with director Ivalo Frank.

Echoes is a dramatically artistic documentary short illustrating the contrasting elements of existence. To put that into a more localised context, the award winning film explicitly concerns itself with love, life and the consequences of war in the surroundings of the Greenlandic ex-US Navy base Ikateq.
Concentrating on the relationship between the Greenlandic Anna Kuitse Thastum and her Danish husband Arvid, the film plots the course of a human relationship within the lonely beauty of the stark island landscape. Shots of empty rooms and abandoned buildings show case the effects of the passage of time and the echoes of the past resound in clear and unrelenting fashion.
The secluded ghost town of the military headquarters offers the viewer ultimate contrasts of war time defence industry versus nature in its purest setting. The film captures loving interaction in a mystical setting. Arvid and Anna tell their story in rich detail, describing their early meetings on the island with a lively sense of humour and vitality.
The haunting wind chimes and the memories of the social drum dancing of Greenlandic tradition intermingle with the abandoned machinery, vehicles and thousands of empty oil barrels to create an intensely evocative portrait of individuals’ effects on each other – and their landscape. A textural electronic score adds further to the remote mood of displacement and isolated splendour.
Shot in gloriously defined detail, Echoes uncovers the universals of enduring love in the most remote of locations, focusing on the principle states of being that keep us all alive, intrigued and in tune with the rhythms of life. – Robert Monk, 2013

Ekspeditionen Expedition
 
Ekspeditionen

Expedition

Dir. Per Kirkeby

  • Original title: Ekspeditionen
  • 1988
  • 31min
  • Danish
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 29/8/2014 7PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 19/9/2014 9PM
    Director Per Kirkeby will be present at the screening.

A slide-show detailing Danish expedition members and their disappearance into landscape whereby the film cycle represents time. Single images are combined with essayistic comments read by Kirkeby, but the elements are joined together so that they together form a quite intricate, experimental whole, a kind of ‘new story’ – a ‘combination process.’ – NP 2014

Expedition to the End of the World Expedition to the End of the World
Expedition to the End of the World

Expedition to the End of the World

Dir. Daniel Dencik

  • 2013
  • 90 mins
  • Danish with English subtitles

A fascinating journey to the physical and metaphorical edges of the Earth, this thoughtful documentary highlights the many different views concerning the planet’s health and the ecological turmoil humankind has brought upon it. The camera gaze of film maker Daniel Dencik captures the Noah’s Ark voyage of scientists, illustrators, photographers and archaeologists as they make their way to the North-East tip of Greenland. Along the way, they encounter melting icebergs, hungry polar bears and imposing glacial fronts.
At the core of the film is the existential idea that one cannot escape oneself. As many of the crew communicate, this is just as true for a species as it is for individuals. The belief is expressed that it is time for humanity to take responsibility for its actions, or suffer the consequences. This warning tone is balanced out by the wry humour enjoyed on board and also the reality of new life forms and adaptations to changing climates and conditions.
The unusual soundtrack of classical music mixed with high-speed thrash metal points to the attempted integration of different viewpoints, backgrounds and expressive identities. Through the discussion of what their lives and work mean to them, a detailed picture beautifully illustrates exactly where we find ourselves now.
Featuring scenes of overwhelming beauty and offering a compelling case for viewing the world in a different way, Expedition to the End of the World is quite the experience. -
Robert Monk, 2014

Tike Qiterleq Mikileraq Eqeqqoq Fore Finger, Middle Finger,...
Tike Qiterleq Mikileraq Eqeqqoq

Fore Finger, Middle Finger, Ring Finger, Little Finger

Dir. Ujarneq Fleischer

  • Original title: Tikeq, Qiterleq, Mikileraq, Eqeqqoq
  • 2008
  • 90 mins
  • Greenlandic with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 30/8/2014 7PM
    Q&A with director Ujarneq Fleischer.
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 20/9/2014 4:30PM

The very first Greenlandic feature film, this comedy adventure brings amusing and moving insight into growing up in Greenland. Concentrating on four close friends living in the small town of Sisimiut the film takes them on a journey of self-discovery about life’s essentials.
Introducing us to this vibrant world of teenage desires and motivations is the film’s director Fleischer who plays the self-styled leader of the gang. He and his friends take in a lively tour of their local area in largely hand-held no-budget style, relying on comic timing and inventive filmic devices to keep the original story progressing in well-paced fashion.
A film with a warm heart and plenty of laughs, Tikeq, Qiterlew, Mikileraq, Eqeqqoq can be proud to be its nations first full length movie. Clearly displaying the value of understanding yourself and others around you, it is a piece that surprises with a wisdom that people from anywhere can relate to. – Robert Monk, 2014

Fuck You Kiss Me Fuck You
Kiss Me
Fuck You Kiss Me

Fuck You Kiss Me

Dir. Eva Marie Rødbro

  • 2008
  • 6mins
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 1/9/2014 7PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 23/9/2014 4:30PM

Focusing on a collection of both still and moving images linked by an examination of Greenlandic youth, Rødbro’s film is a transfixing production in art cinema. Scenes of traditional landscapes and activities are interspersed with the more immediate concerns of the young such as dancing, music and kissing. Along the way scenes are repeated and returned to raising questions about the symmetry of life. A video of a lone husky dog fated to continually wander around a circle seems to ask the audience how much we are all in a
similar position. Combining art photography and documentary film techniques, Fuck You Kiss Me offers a memorable view of the Greenlandic young. – Robert Monk, 2014

Green Land Green Land
 
Green Land

Green Land

Dir. Aka Hansen

  • 2009
  • 24 mins
  • Greenlandic with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 31/8/2104 4:30PM
    Q&A with director Aka Hansen.

Aka Hansen makes a trip to Southern Greenland to find out what today’s young people living there think about the global situation, the changing climate and the future. – NP, 2014

Greenland Unrealised Greenland Unrealised
Greenland Unrealised

Greenland Unrealised

Dir. Dania Reymond

  • 2013
  • 10mins
  • Greenlandic with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 1/9/2014 7PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 23/9/2013 9PM
  • (FO) Runavik, Bókasavnið við Løkin 11/10/2014 9PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 1/11/2014 8PM
  • (SE) Stockholm, Tellus Bio 12/11/2014 8PM
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 21/11/2014 6PM
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 13/12/2014 7PM

Inspired by an un-filmed script from Micheangelo Antonioni, Greenland Unrealised takes a unique look at the arctic coast line via computer generated visualisation and vocal performances from the other end of the world.
This curious combination of Taiwanese singing and evocative translated readings from the Italian filmmaker’s script brings a wholly original way of looking at the country. The mixed elements of poetic myth and historical stories create a calming feeling of peace as the audience is swept along the binary curves of the striking animation.
Bringing to mind the truly distinct nature of the Greenlandic landscape, the film cleanly identifies the shapes and contrasts that lie above and beneath the land of ice and rapidly changing water. – Robert Monk, 2013

Greenland Year Zero Greenland Year Zero
Greenland Year Zero

Greenland Year Zero

Dir. Anders Graver, Niels Bjørn

  • 2011
  • 26 mins
  • Danish with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 31/8/2014 4:30PM

GREENLAND YEAR ZERO is both a short documentary and cinematographic journey in a country presently facing some of the greatest changes in its history: political independence and autonomy from its former colonizer, Denmark, visible traces of climate change and new oilfindings, that give birth to to dreams of considerable future profits.The film experiments with layers of sound, landscape cinematography and with stylistic renditions of everyday life in Greenland. It portrays the world of 4 Highschool students in the small town, Aasiaat, on Greenlands westcoast, where just a hundred miles offshore companies are drilling for oil. If the drills prove positive, the town as well as the life conditions of the young students will change forever. – NP, 2014

Hinnarik's Dream Hinnarik's Dream
 
Hinnarik's Dream

Hinnarik's Dream

Dir. Angajo Lennart-Sandgreen

  • Original title: Hinnarik Sinnattunilu
  • 2010
  • 80mins
  • Greenlandic with English subtitles
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 21/9/2013 4:30PM
    Q&A with producer Aka Hansen.
  • (FO) Torshavn, Nordic House 8/10/2014 9PM
    Q&A with producer Aka Hansen.
  • (FO) Runavik, Bókasavnið við Løkin 12/10/2014 7PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 31/10/2014 6PM
  • (FI) Rovaniemi, Arktikum 7/11/2014 12PM
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 23/11/2014 6PM

Telling the story of the warm-hearted titular character Hinnarik (filmmaker Sandgreen), Greenland’s first every comedy film is both funny and moving in equal measures. During the course of this uplifting story our somewhat socially challenged anti-hero discovers love, gains superpowers and learns how to rap. Hinnarik certainly shows off its originality with a flair for the unusual!
Life in the Nuuk housing project Blok P has clearly not always been easy for Hinnarik and the audience is left cheering him on as he progresses with his eventful life. Through a mixture of luck, good intentions and some prayers to Liam Neeson in The Phantom Menace, Hinnarik finds out life’s beauty in its many shapes and forms.
The gangly bespectacled Hinnarik resembles the American hero of the comedy film Napoleon Dynamite and the film shares some of that indie-favourite’s combination of black humour, visual gags and physical comedy. Appealing to all lovers of ‘geek-chic’, this transposition of alienated laughs to Greenland is worth more than its weight in gold. – Robert Monk, 2014

Inuk Inuk
Inuk

Inuk

Dir. Mike Magidson

  • 2012
  • 90mins
  • Danish with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 31/8/2014 7PM
  • The screening is preceded by a concert by children from the Children’s Home Uummannaq.
  • (FO) Torshavn, Nordic House 7/10/2014 9PM
    Q&A with director Mike Magidson
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 31/10/2014 8PM
    Q&A with producer Marc Buriot
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 21/11/2014 8PM
    Q&A with director Mike Magidson
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 17/12/2014 8PM
    Q&A with director Mike Magidson

Inuk is an inspiring coming of age tale set amidst the stunning backdrop of Northern Greenland. Featuring emotionally rich performances and a thoughtful and well-balanced story of discovery, the film is a moving account of finding a home. The necessity of confronting life’s hardships and struggles is bought into clear focus by Magidson’s eloquent approach to storytelling.
The film traces Inuk’s (Gaba Petersen) unhappy home life with his alcohol dependent mother and step-father, to his being taken into care in the north Greenland surroundings of his early childhood. Here the quiet and withdrawn boy slowly begins to blossom, learning about the wild nature of the ice covered environment in the company of fellow orphans and hunters.
The wonderfully captured backdrops provide a stunning template for the poignant personal story on display. The changes that Inuk experiences in going from boyhood to manhood are also reflected in the dynamic transformations in culture and development that this area has also had to learn to cope with. Fundamental alterations in attitude as well as the environment have brought a variety of new challenges for this area to address.
Featuring marvellous shots of ice covered peaks and valleys, the film acts as a magical confirmation of the power of feeling at one with an environment. As the old hunter and Inuk’smentor declares: “For us Inuit, ice is more than a word, it’s our soul!” –
Robert Monk, 2013

Killormut Upside Down
(Killormut)
Killormut

Killormut (Upside Down)

Dir. Ulannaq Ingemann

  • Original title: Killormut
  • 2014
  • 8mins
  • Greenlandic with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 3/9/2014 7PM
    Q&A with director Ulannaq Ingemann.
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 20/9/2014 9PM
  • (FO) Runavik, Bókasavnið við Løkin 12/10/2014 7PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 31/10/2014 6PM
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 14/12/2014 8PM

Exploring a tautly claustrophobic sense of life on the open road – both spiritually and physically – Ingemann’s affecting short is a disturbing picture of life decisions and how those decisions can rapidly change. Bolstered by a commanding performance from Mike Philip Fencker Thomsen, the film brings something of the uncertainty of survival in visceral form with the antagonism and raw sounds of the central character’s experience marking an existential journey of intense proportions.
With a rich ambiguity providing plenty of food for thought, an audience can be left pondering the intricacies and double-meanings locked throughout an individual’s existence on the road and in the world. -
Robert Monk, 2014

Aulahuliat Moving Images (Aulahuliat)
Aulahuliat

Moving Images

Dir. Uusaqqak Qujaukitsaq

  • Original title: Aulahuliat
  • 2003
  • 45mins
  • Greenlandic with English subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 2/9/2014 7PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 23/9/2014 7PM
  • (FO) Torshavn, Nordic House 6/10/2014 7PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 2/11/2014 6PM
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 24/11/2014 6PM
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 17/12/2014 6PM

This short documentary makes use of the filmmaker’s personal footage of daily lives and activities. The changes witnessed in the Northern Greenlandic region of Thule are captured in a free-flowing poetic visualisation of the struggles these proud people have and continue to experience. When forced out of their homes by a foreign power, the inhabitants lead a mobile and unsettled life. Featuring rare and vintage video, the emotional journey of the film is told in a strikingly honest humanitarian tone.
The film features fine stories of the culture’s problems with adapting to modernity. A cinema audience watching their first movie with sound are shocked out of their skins when roaring flames and fires fill the screen. It is just one of the examples of how the culture is forced to adapt to new experiences fundamentally and rapidly.
The cultural links between Greenland and Northern Canada are also given focus, as is the political history and industrial quarrels over the land. These quarrels amidst the harsh weather and animal sickness are all part of the people’s struggle.
Natural scenes of overwhelming beauty successfully contextualise these difficulties in the most stunning of ways. An audience can expect to feel both humbled and engaged by the community life story on display. – Robert Monk, 2013

Mój Norweski Dziadek - My Norwegian Grandfather My Norwegian Grandfather
Mój Norweski Dziadek - My Norwegian Grandfather

My Norwegian Grandfather

Dir. Liev Igor Devold

  • 2010
  • 20 mins
  • Polish with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 2/9/2014 9PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 23/9/2014 7PM
    Q&A with the director Liev Igor Devold.
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 3/11/2014 6PM
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 17/12/2014 6PM

Taking the personal documentary style of short film into unchartered waters, My Norwegian Grandfather is an emotionally rich story exploring obsession, identity and cross generational culpability and remorse. The film uses the Polish born and Norwegian educated Devold’s grandfather’s Nazi-Germany co-operated forays into Greenland as its strongly volatile subject. Trying to discover exactly what the motivation was for his cooperation before and during WWII is the film’s central issue. The ambition and drive to succeed in his colonial goals is made clear through his grandson’s terse and emotive narration.
The troubling vignettes of cultural history and fixated career drive are established with a precise depth of feeling and quality of judgement. Archive photographs and vintage news video meld seamlessly into the modern motion capture. Sound forms and the musical intonations further contextualise the range of sensations experienced through Devold’s focused gaze. – Robert Monk, 2014

Nuuk Nuan Nuuk Nuan
 
Nuuk Nuan

Nuuk Nuan

Dir. Tove Maurtvedt

  • 2011
  • 30 mins
  • Danish with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 31/8/2014 4:30PM
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 16/12/2014 6PM
    Q&A with director Tove Maurfeldt

This affecting short documentary from the acclaimed filmmaker Tove Maurtvedt presents a compelling view of everyday Greenlandic life seen through the eyes of a young girl. Esther is a bright teenager from Nuuk who shares with us and the director the joys of her everyday life. The director draws together her reflections and knowledge about the city and its natural environment in a picture that is at once moving and fascinating. For a view of growing up in Nuuk, it stands out as a moving record of life at the point of adolescence. . – Robert Monk 2014

Nuummioq - Someone from Nuuk Nuummioq
Nuummioq - Someone from Nuuk

Nuummioq (Someone from Nuuk)

Dir. Otto Rosing & Torben Bech

  • Original title: Nuummioq
  • 2009
  • 95mins
  • Danish with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 3/9/2014 7PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 18/9/2014 7PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 20/9/2014 9PM
    Q&A with directors Otto Rosing & Torben Beck
  • (FO) Torshavn, Nordic House 5/10/2014 5PM
    Q&A with protagonist Lars Rosing
  • (FO) Runavik, Bókasavnið við Løkin 11/10/2014 7PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 30/10/2014 6PM
    Q&A with director Otto Rosing
  • (FI) Rovaniemi, Arktikum 7/11/2014 4PM
  • (SE) Stockholm, Tellus Bio 9/11/2014 8PM
    Q&A with director Otto Rosing
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 20/11/2014 6PM
    Q&A with director Otto Rosing
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 12/12/2014 7PM
    Q&A with director Otto Rosing

This evocative exploration of mortality offers a uniquely Greenlandic way of looking at the world. Featuring a cast of amateur actors, the film is the first Greenlandic production made for the international market.
Following Malik’s (Lars Rosing) city life in Nuuk, the film uses a fascinating mixture of dramatic narratives and stunning scenes of nature in all of its glory. The story concentrates on Malik as he lives, works and plays with his group of friends and family. Stories of casual romances, all night drinking and carefree living neatly contrast with the melancholic realisation that follows.
This untroubled attitude is abruptly curtailed when Malik is suddenly forced to make a stark decision regarding his health. What follows is an otherworldly pursuit for meaning and hope for the future, while at the same time examining the gradual coming to terms with the mysteries of the past.
Malik accompanies his cousin Michael (Angunnguaq Larsen) on a boat trip, ostensibly to shoot some film for a commercial project. As the trip continues, the two cousins encounter various characters and scenes redolent of Greenlandic folklore and tradition. These lead Michael to a growing understanding of his mortality and existence.
Creating a powerful sense of the essentials in life, the film sparks a feeling of optimism in even the darkest of circumstances. Nuummioq presents a thoroughly original approach to the eternal questions of personal identity and life. -
Robert Monk, 2013

Sermiliaaq Sermiligaaq
65°54'N, 36°22'W
Sermiliaaq

Sermiligaaq 65°54'N, 36°22'W

Dir. Anni Seitz and Sophie Elixhauser

  • 2008
  • 63 mins
  • Greenlandic with English and German Subtitles
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 24/9/2014 4:30PM
    Q&A with directors Sophie Elixhauser and Anni Seitz.
  • (FO) Torshavn, Nordic House 7/10/2014 7PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 3/11/2014 6PM

The people of East Greenland inhabit a small string of coastal land at the edge of the biggest island of the world. Long winters have always shaped daily life here, a life that has gone within a few generations from earth house to modernity, complete with helicopters and satellite TV. This documentary shows us East Greenland today, the village in summer and winter, the family between seal hunting and computer games. It lets us experience in clear and poetical scenes normality in an extraordinary world, quietly observing events, faces, gestures that combine to form a portrait that is at the same time strange and strangely familiar. -
Robert Monk, 2014

The Shaman Shaman
 
The Shaman

Shaman

Dir. Luc Perez

  • 2008
  • 11mins
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 1/9/2014 7PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 23/9/2014 4:30PM
    Q&A with the director Luc Perez.
  • (SE) Stockholm, Tellus Bio 13/11/2014 8PM
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 13/12/2014 5PM

A non-verbal animation film rich in colour and symbolism, Shaman is a truly remarkable visual experience. The French filmmaker Perez makes use of acrylic paintings composed together in a beautifully textured and poetic fashion to illustrate the free flowing story.
Focusing on the dream-memories of an aging Inuit in the big city of Copenhagen, the story explores the mythic and magical elements of the hunting and shamanistic culture of Greenland. The audience follows the old man’s rich internal flight through the wilds of his homeland as he encounters fear, experience and learning.
The progression from hunter to shaman is captured in marvellously accomplished style, with the reminiscences of a changed man – and a changed world – brought home with a fantastic intensity of imagery. In short, this animation is one to get lost in and hold onto! – Robert Monk, 2014

SOS Iceberg SOS Iceberg
 
SOS Iceberg

SOS Iceberg

Dir. Arnold Fanck

  • 1933
  • 77mins
  • German with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 31/8/2014 9PM
    Q&A with the grandson of Arnold Fanck, Matthias Fanck.
  • (FO) Runavik, Bókasavnið við Løkin 12/10/2014 9PM
  • (SE) Stockholm, Tellus Bio 9/11/2014 5PM

SOS Iceberg revolves around an expedition of four men who set off to Greenland to rescue an explorer previously presumed dead, but whose survival is attested to by a note written on a piece of jetsam. A young Leni Riefenstahl stars in this extravagant Universal production whose main raison d´être seems to be the staging of the sublime icebergs. – NP, 2014

Souls in a Room Souls in a Room
 
Souls in a Room

Souls in a Room (The Making of an Album)

Dir. Mikisoq H. Lynge

  • 2014
  • 44mins
  • Danish/English with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 29/8/2014 7PM
    Q&A with director Mikisoq H. Lynge.
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 19/9/2014 9PM
    Q&A with director Mikisoq H. Lynge.
  • (FO) Torshavn, Nordic House 9/10/2014 5PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 4/11/2014 6PM
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 22/11/2014 11AM
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 14/12/2014 6PM

In this honest account of the alternating struggles and positivity associated with art and creativity, filmmaker and first time documentary director Mikisoq H. Lynge follows internationally recognized singer-song writer Simon Lynge as he records the follow-up to his acclaimed debut album ”The Future”.
Lynge records final versions of 12 new songs, over a period of 10 days, with $35.000 and 700 Kickstarter backers behind him. Interspersed between recording sessions and driving the streets of L.A., Lynge offers candid answers about living abroad, making music and the importance of his family.
This is a film about music, family and the benefits of hard work. – Robert Monk, 2014

Sume Sume - the sound of a revolution
Sume

Sume - the sound of a revolution

Dir. Inuk Silis Høegh

  • Original title: Sume – Mumisitsinerup Nipaa
  • 2014
  • 72mins
  • Greenlandic/Danish with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 3/9/2014 9PM
    Q&A with director Inuk Silis Hoegh and producer Emile Peronard.
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 24/9/2014 7PM
    Q&A with director Inuk Silis Hoegh and producer Emile Peronard.

A potent documentary examining the cultural importance of the Greenlandic band Sumé, this resourcefully constructed film presents a testimony to the potential for music and lyrics to express powerful ideas and a motivation for change.The group, made up of Greenlandic students studying in Denmark, formed in 1973 and quickly established a loyal audience. The band impressed not only for their psychedelic influences and stirring arrangements and harmonies, but also for the fact that they were the first rock band to sing solely in their native tongue. Fans, managers and band members all offer their opinion about just what made them so special in a series of balanced interviews and commentary.
As the film’s title suggests, Sumé had an overtly political message that simultaneously caused interest and concern. Lyricist and vocalist Malik Høegh’s song poems contained rousing direct messages to his fellow Greenlanders to rediscover their true identify in an era of foreign rule. This overtly political stance created a degree of tension with another founding band member, Per Berthelsen (interestingly enough, now a leading Greenlandic politician).
The film uses the contrasting personalities of the two to creatively express the different dimensions of opinion that were in the air of the 1970s. The film offers a fascinating insight into a beautifully crafted rock band of revolutionary appeal. Above all else, the music – and the message – stands the test of time. – Robert Monk, 2014

Drømmen The Dream
Drømmen

The Dream

Dir. Malik Foss, David Wogelius, Kunuutt Kleeman

  • Original title: Drømmen
  • 2014
  • 7mins
  • Danish
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 30/8/2014 9PM
    The screening is followed by a Q&A with the film team.
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 21/9/2014 4:30PM

A short from film students at Nuuk University, this look into one boy’s dream world is an uplifting take on the precariousness of existence. Centring on one boy’s return home to a typical Nuuk family apartment, the film shows two alternate takes on his following morning. Shot and edited with a confidence and distinction that belies the relative inexperience of the filmmakers, the ‘what if?’ style drama manages to fill its running time with an evocative response to modern lives in Greenland. The film is scored with haunting visual and sonic melodies, stretching this dream from start to finish in intriguing fashion. – Robert Monk, 2014

The Girl and the Dogs

The Girl and the Dogs

Dir. Selma Vilhunen & Guillaume Mainguet

  • 2014
  • 15 mins
  • Danish with English Subtitles
  • (FI) Inari, Saamelaiskulttuurikeskus Sajos 22/11/2014 11AM

Mette, Lina and Anna Sophie, 3 teenagers, are on their way to a party. A strange discovery on a local beach will change the very nature of their friendship.

The Prize of the Pole The Prize of the Pole
The Prize of the Pole

The Prize of the Pole

Dir. Staffan Julén

  • 2006
  • 80mins
  • Greenlandic/English with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 1/9/2014 9PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 3/11/2014 8PM
    Q&A with protagonist Robert E. Peary II
  • (SE) Stockholm, Tellus Bio 12/11/2014 8PM
    Q&A with director Staffan Julen
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 14/12/2014 8PM
    Q&A with director Staffan Julen

Tracing a personal voyage of discovery through the quagmires of history and the shifting waters of cultural and anthropological ideas, this hugely affecting documentary film presents an emotional journey through generations and continents. Making eloquent use of antique video and still images from the late 19th century, The Prize of the Pole charts the progress of the Innuit hunter Hivshu (also known as Robert E. Peary II) as he attempts to discover the truth of his American great-Grandfather’s life and work.
Staffan Julén’s film intersperses Hivshu’s thoughtful narrative with the recounting of Greenlandic natives’ experiences with the American explorer. The more troubling aspects of the legendary scientist’s zeal and quest for fame are never glossed over, and the film goes a long way in addressing some of the misgivings and reckless mistreatment that the age saw far too much of.
Central to this darker side of scientific study is the story of the youngest of the Innuit family that Peary I brought back with him to New York. The point of this activity was heralded as anthropological research, but to modern eyes it came out as little more than fairground exhibitionism and exploitation.
Minik was the youngest of the family – only six when he was enlisted, or more accurately, abducted – and can be seen as a modern hero of tragic circumstances. Left to grow up without a home, the remarkably tough and resourceful boy experienced the full force of antiquated standards of cultural, scientific and political imperialism.
The prize for Peary I was the North Pole – a mission he typically referred to in Victoraian fashion as the ‘discovery of the Pole’ – whereas the prize for Hivshu is an acceptance of who he truly is. A powerful and moving work recommended to all with a real sense of adventure, of both the outward and the inward variety. – Robert Monk, 2014

The Sledge Patrol The Sledge Patrol  
The Sledge Patrol

The Sledge Patrol

Dir. Sandra Skibsted

  • 2014
  • 16mins
  • Danish/English with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 2/9/2014 9PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 23/9/2014 7PM
    Q&A with director Sandra Skibsted
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 2/11/2014 6PM
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 17/12/2014 6PM

A documentary film exploring the lesser known political and sociological historical contexts of the relationship between Greenland, Denmark and North America, The Sledge Patrol is an absorbing look at an era that helped to define not only modern Greenland, but the entire world.
World War II is the time in question, and it was a period that saw Greenland facing stark choices as to where its future loyalties and endeavour lay. As Greenland edged ever closer to the USA and Canada, Denmark had to contemplate the very real prospect of losing its protectorate all together. Making use of expert historical analysis, the film blends archive footage and photography with an academic perspective of this tumultuous period of history.
The title refers to the local Greenlandic dog-sled teams who were entrusted with observing Nazi German activity on the North East section of the country, a corner of land as big as Germany itself. Capturing the essence of what it is like to be dedicated to an activity where you can’t hide – from yourself or from anyone else for that matter – this is a film that serves as a commanding reminder of the lives that were pushed to the edge by this conflict. – Robert Monk, 2014

Sullorsuaq - The Tunnel The Tunnel
(Sullorsuaq)
Sullorsuaq - The Tunnel

The Tunnel

Dir. Marc Fussing Rosbach

  • Original title: Sullorsuaq
  • 2012
  • 2mins
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 2/9/2014 7PM

A tense and ultimately terrifying journey through a pedestrian town tunnel, Rosbach’s short clearly demonstrates the fear of the unknown. Horror fans will find familiar themes in the nervous glances towards the dark corners of urban constructions. The openings – and closings of the mind’s imagination – are also expertly captured in this alarming wander into the dark. – Robert Monk, 2014

The Whisper The Whisper
 
The Whisper

The Whisper

Dir. Knud Petersen

  • 2014
  • 8mins
  • Danish with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 30/8/2014 4:30PM
    The screening is followed by a special Q&A.
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 20/9/2014 4:30PM

Peter is a young man who in his spare time works as a cleaner. Upon checking in at work he contacts a colleague who confirms that Peter will be working alone. During the course of the evening to he begins to hear whispers, which lead him to open a door to an underground room and discover the body of a woman, seemingly dead.
In this tense and psychological short director Knud Petersen builds a sense a dread in the viewer. You suspect that something may happen but you don’t know what or when and yet the film still manages to surprise. -
Robert Monk, 2014

Tupilaq Tupilaq
 
Tupilaq

Tupilaq

Dir. Jakob Maqe

  • 2013
  • 6 mins
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 1/9/2014 9PM
    Q&A with director Jakob Maqe.
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 20/9/2014 7:15PM
  • (FO) Torshavn, Nordic House 6/10/2014 9PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 3/11/2014 8PM
  • (SE) Stockholm, Tellus Bio 9/11/2014 5PM
    Q&A with director Jakob Maqe.
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 23/11/2014 8PM
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 12/12/2014 7PM
    Q&A with director Jakob Maqe.

A haunting animation exploring the existential anguish of urban living when missing your home, Maqe’s short film is a master class in beautifully crafted angst.
Through the use of the ancient Greenlandic symbol of the ‘tupilak’ – a shifting carved object in this case masking the hero’s true features – Maqe illustrates the contrasts between modern Western living and the land of the Greenlanders.
The award winning short film is a deeply personal account of how we all sometimes mask our true feelings in order to survive in the world. The highly accomplished film does not need the restraints of dialogue or language to broach its subject matter of feelings of inadequacy and disjointedness, instead relying on sound textures to combine with the detailed paintwork and storyboarding on show.
Highly recommended to all lovers of animation, and indeed, artwork itself, Tupilaq is a profoundly moving piece. – Robert Monk, 2014

Tønnes Kamp Tønne's Fight  
Tønnes Kamp

Tønne's Fight

Dir. Nuka Bisgaard and Pipaluk K. Jørgensen

  • Original title: Tønnes kamp
  • 2014
  • 8mins
  • Danish
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 1/9/2014 9PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 23/9/2014 4:30PM

This very sweet little sketch depicts a dialogue between two people (their sexes are unclear) discussing the up’s and down’s of their relationship. Adopting a rough style, this short satirises both relationship trivialities, man versus women (one of the characters is played by Greenland’s most famous drag queen Nuka the Diva) and on another level there are clear hints of the language style of the Danish labourers who represent a large percentage of the Danish presence in Greenland.
The film gently mocks the past understanding of the civilised versus the uncivilised as well as society’s definitions of what is normal and abnormal. If anyone doubts the presence of a Greenlandic avant-garde they should pay particular attention to this amusing short film. – Robert Monk, 2014

Village at the End of the World Village at the End of the World
Village at the End of the World

Village at the End of the World

Dir. David Katznelson, Sarah Gavron

  • 2012
  • 82 mins
  • Danish/Greenlandic with English subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 30/8/2014 7PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 23/9/2014 9PM
    Q&A with co-director David Katznelson.
  • (FO) Runavik, Bókasavnið við Løkin 11/10/2014 9PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 1/11/2014 8PM
  • (FI) Rovaniemi, Arktikum 7/11/2014 2PM
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 21/11/2014 6PM
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 13/12/2014 7PM

This richly orchestrated documentary film showcases the close-knit lives and livelihoods of the families living in the tiny village of Niaqornat in North West Greenland. A settlement of only 59 people, the area is home to more dogs than humans. It is also an area with no viable method of supporting itself, a fact that the filmmakers explore with detailed compassion.
The possibility of the villagers being re-housed away from Niaqornat is an ever-present fear for some and one that draws the community into action. However, the story of a struggling village is far more complicated than one of survival. Some of the villagers, especially the only teenager in the village, just want to leave.
The teenage figure of Lars acts as a counterpoint to the traditional activities of the village and its surroundings. For one, he has no intention of becoming a hunter, a typical career choice for the local males of the population. Instead he plans to go away and study and cultivate a more real social life than the one he habitually manages on the internet and Facebook.
Along with Lars, there are a set of intriguing characters such as Karl the hunter, Ilanngauq, the outsider from the other side of Greenland and Annie the oldest woman in the village. Composing an engaging picture of diverse beliefs, feelings and learning to live with your own situation, the Village at the end of the world is not so far away from any of us. – Robert Monk, 2013

Violence Done Well Violence Done Well
Violence Done Well

Violence Done Well

Dir. Maida Hals

  • 2014
  • 4mins
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 29/8/2014 7PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 19/9/2014 9PM
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 14/12/2014 6PM
    Q&A with director Maida Hals and dancer Alexander Montgomery-Andersen

Featuring Greenlandic dancer, Alexander Montgomery-Andersen, director Maida Hals has captured a world of reflections, whereby a dancer is pushed to the limits in this beautiful and gloomy music video for talented Norwegian songstress Eline Thorp. – NP, 2014

Weiße Konturen - White Outlines White Outlines
Weiße Konturen - White Outlines

White Outlines

Dir. Ondrej Kotas

  • Original title: Weisse Konturen
  • 2011
  • 37mins
  • Czech/German with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 2/9/2014 7PM

Two young Czech and German adventurers spent several weeks travelling over the continental glacier, and the film allows the audience to share their ice and snow experience. – NP, 2014

Sooq Akersuuttugut - Why We Fight Why We Fight
 
Sooq Akersuuttugut - Why We Fight

Why We Fight - Sooq Akersuuttugut

Dir. Inuk Silis Høegh

  • Original title: Sooq Akersuuttugut
  • 2006
  • 5 mins
  • Greenlandic with English Subtitles
  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 28/8/2014 7PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Cinemateket 23/9/2014 4:30PM
  • (FO) Torshavn, Nordic House 8/10/2014 9PM
  • (FO) Runavik, Bókasavnið við Løkin 12/10/2014 9PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 2/11/2014 8PM
  • (SE) Stockholm, Tellus Bio 9/11/2014 8PM
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 24/11/2014
  • (NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 18/12/2014 6PM

Imagining just how a Greenlandic military recruitment promotional film would look, Inuk Silis Høegh has melded evocative images of the land alongside scenes of military prowess. The flights of fighter jets and bombers and the voyages of sea-faring attack ships are interspersed with the more familiar sights of flower lined hill tops and children playing in the snow.
As a wry commentary on what Greenland stands to lose if commercial and corporate pressures are applied unevenly in the region, Sooq Akersuuttugut – Why We Fight is a stark reminder of exactly what the country has to offer… Høegh employs a sharp editing style contrasting the scenic portraits of Greenland with the military might of the superpowers just over the borders. The use of contrasting music of stirring classical brass with a more modern house influenced sound is further evidence of the film’s attention to original composition.
“The world is closing in …there is no use in hiding!” the Greenlandic Military voiceover reminds the viewer in impassioned tones. As an imaginary call to arms it offers an effective view of just how a war faring Greenland might rally itself. – Robert Monk, 2014


Concerts

Dánjal
 

Dánjal

MUSIC

  • (FO) Torshavn, Nordic House 9/10/2014 7:30PM

Dánjal comes from the Faroe Islands, and much like the Faroese weather, Dánjal’s music can change from storm into a calm whisper in a second. Like the landscape it’s wild, melodic and aims for the most sensitive nerve.

At the Greenland Eyes festival Dánjal plays at the same bill as Small Time Giants.

Jenny Hval
 

Jenny Hval

MUSIC

  • (NO) Oslo, Victoria Nasjonal Jazzscene 18/12/2014 9PM

Jenny Hval (born 11 July 1980 in Oslo, Norway) is a Norwegian singer, composer, lyricist and writer. She has released four albums – two under the moniker Rockettothesky, and two under her name Jenny Hval.
She studied in University of Melbourne, Australia, specializing in creative writing and performance. While studying, she was vocalist in Australian bands iPanic and Folding For Air with Thomas McGowan releasing an EP “Are you afraid of heights?” in 2004.
Moving back to Norway, she released her debut EP Cigars in 2006, and was nominated for a Spellemannprisen (the Norwegian equivalent of Grammy awards) in the “best newcomer” category. Adopting the name Rockettothesky, she was signed to Trust Me Records, releasing two studio albums – To Sing You Apple Trees in 2006, and Medea in 2008.
Following the release of Medea, she went back to using her birth name Jenny Hval. Signing with Rune Grammofon, she has so far released the albums Viscera (2011) and Innocence Is Kinky (2013).

At the Greenland Eyes festival Jenny Hval plays at the same bill as Nive Nielsen and the Deer Children.

Kostcirklen Kostcirklen
 
Kostcirklen

Kostcirklen

MUSIC

  • (DK) Copenhagen, Nordatlantens Brygge 24/9/2014 10PM

With classical rock composition, untraditional Swedish lyrics, this unusual pop orchestra offers a concert experience, which challenges the usual genre definitions and modes of expressions. At the Greenland Eyes festival Kostcirklen plays at the same bill as Nive Nielsen and the Deer Children.

Nils Berg Cinemascope

Nils Berg Cinemascope

MUSIC

  • (SE) Stockholm, Landet 14/11/2014 9PM

Nils Berg Cinemascope is a swedish jazz trio, basing their music and performances around a movie projector. Some of the members are: a balafon master from Accra, giggling teenagers from Brunei, a shy Japanese lady and her flute, and an Indian dance group with rock hard feet.

How did this happen? A bunch of YouTube clips from all over the world got Nils started with this stunning project. The video clips have been thoroughly chopped, grinded and baked into new music. When the band performs, reed player Nils Berg is accompanied by drummer Christopher Cantillo and bassist Josef Kallerdahl on stage. Alongside the band is a film screen showing the far-away-guests, who are seen, heard and incorporated into the live music. A new quartet for each song.

Berg is one of the most influential voices in Nordic jazz. With his quartet, The Stoner, he has made a name for himself both in Sweden and internationally, and in 2007 he received the prestigious Jazz-in-Sweden-award.
At the Greenland Eyes festival Nils Berg Cinemascope plays at the same bill as Nive Nielsen and the Deer Children.

Nive Nielsen and the Deer Children Nive Nielsen and the Deer Children
Nive Nielsen and the Deer Children

Nive Nielsen and the Deer Children

MUSIC

  • (DK) Copenhagen, Nordatlantens Brygge 24/9/2014 10PM
  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 5/11/2014 9PM
  • (SE) Stockholm, Landet 14/11/2014 9PM
  • (NO) Oslo, Victoria Nasjonal Jazzscene 18/12/2014 9PM

“My name is Nive. I ‘m an Inuk, a real eskimo from Greenland. Seriously. I play music, mostly on my little red ukelele and with some help from my friends. I like that. You can hear some of my songs on my
W:www.nivenielsen.com/

Pamyua for Web Pamyua
 
Pamyua for Web

Pamyua

MUSIC

  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 29/8/2014 10PM

Pamyua’s music is self-described as “tribal funk” and “world music”. Most of their songs are based on traditional Yupik, Inuit and Greenlandic chants, but the group is well known for reinterpreting them in modern styles, such as the song “Cayauqa Nauwa”, which has been performed a cappella (mengluni, 1998) and with Pacific Islander influences (Caught in the Act, 2003), as well as traditionally (Drums of the North, 2005).

At the Greenland Eyes festival Pamyua plays at the same bill as Small Time Giants.

Samaris Samaris
 
Samaris

Samaris

MUSIC

  • (IS) Reykjavik, Nordic House 5/11/2014 9PM

Samaris is an electronic music group from Iceland which formed in January 2011 and consists of Áslaug Rún Magnúsdóttir (clarinet), Þórður Kári Steinþórsson (electronics) and Jófríður Ákadóttir (vocals).1

After forming in January 2011, Samaris entered and won the 2011 Icelandic Músíktilraunir competition.2 Þórður also won the Keyboard/Programmer prize.3 Following this, the group self-released their Hljóma Þú (2011) EP, which won the band an Icelandic Kraumur award.4 In August 2011, Samaris took part in a music event in The Netherlands which brought together acts from Norway, The Netherlands, Poland, France, Germany and Iceland.5 In October 2011, Samaris performed at the Iceland Airwaves festival.
At the Greenland Eyes festival Kostcirklen plays at the same bill as Nive Nielsen and the Deer Children.

Simon Lynge
 

Simon Lynge

MUSIC

  • (FI) Inari, Saamelaiskulttuurikeskus Sajos 22/11/2014 5:30PM

Simon Lynge (born 22 January 1980) is a singer-songwriter who was raised in Greenland.
Lynge is the first solo musical artist from Greenland to have an album released across the United Kingdom, and the first Greenlander to play the UK’s Glastonbury Festival. Lynge has performed extensively across Europe and the United States, and he accompanied Emmylou Harris as support act on the American singer’s 2011 tour of Europe.

Lynge’s 2010 debut album, The Future, described by Rolling Stone magazine as “one of the most memorable and melodic debut albums of recent years”, reached the top of the Amazon.com UK Rock Charts in the week of its release. Lynge’s music has variously been compared by writers to that of Paul Simon, James Taylor, The Beach Boys and The Beatles. Since 2008, Lynge has lived in Jefferson County, Washington.

Small Time Giants for web Small Time Giants
 
Small Time Giants for web

Small Time Giants

MUSIC

  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 29/8/2014 10PM
  • (DK) Copenhagen, Greenland House 17/8/2014 6PM
  • (FO) Torshavn, Nordic House 7/10/2014 9PM

Miki, Jakob, Jonas, Pilutannguaq and Anda are behind the Greenlandic band Small Time Giants. Their style is somewhere between emo post-rock mixed with a tinge of Greenland, alternative tones and acoustic and electronic drums.


Exhibitions

Filip Gielda and Inuuteq Kriegel 13
Filip Gielda and Inuuteq Kriegel

13

EXHIBITION

  • (GL) Nuuk Center 28/8/2014 – 3/9/2014
  • (DK) Copenhagen, The Greenland House 18/9/2014 – 1/10/2014
  • (IS) Reykjavik, The Nordic House 30/10/2014 – 9/11/2014
  • (NO) Oslo, The Norwegian Film Institute 12/12/2014 – 18/12/2014

“13” is a photographic story of the most interesting (in our eyes) people who live in Nuuk, Greenland. The idea is to show those people’s lives and relate them to the Greenlandic reality. The series of black and white photographs will be followed by special kind of private interviews…
13 is a project by Filip Gielda and Inuuteq Kriegel.

Exhibition ISI ISI/EYE/ØJE
Exhibition ISI

ISI/EYE/ØJE

EXHIBITION

  • (DK) Copenhagen, The Greenland House 18/9/2014 – 1/10/2014
  • (FO) Runavik, Bókasavnið við Løkin 11/10/2014 – 12/10/2014
  • (SE) Stockholm, Tellus Bio 9/11/2104 -
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 20/11/2014 -

It is said that the eye is the window to the soul. EYE refers to the camera lens as an eye that views and documents its surroundings.

ISI/EYE/ØJE is an exciting photo project by Pipaluk Lykke Løstrup, showcasing digital photos from amateur photographers from all over the country.


Performances

Espen Haavardsholm

Espen Haavardsholm

Reading from ‘To Nuuk’ by Espen Haavardsholm

(NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 12/12/2014 7PM

I am what I am, yet I also see myself from an outside perspective. It can be that way even in life’s most intimate moments. What if the Other one day becomes the strongest and takes power over me?

Espen Hå is on a train heading south from Oslo Central Station on his way to stay with his Danish childhood friend Klaus Malinowski for the summer. Together they plan to seek magical places from long ago. But that very same day there are warning signs which suggest this holiday will be altogether more harrowing.

The summer takes the two old childhood friends on an inner and actual journey from family secrets in Østerbro in Copenhagen to the impenetrable sea mist near the Greenlandic capital, Nuuk. In the course of a few challenging weeks, they both end up, each in their own way, face to face with their dark doppelgangers.

To Nuuk is a novel about the good and evil in life, about the universe’s dark forces and the songs of the whales around Greenland, and not least about how difficult it can be to face who you really are.

J&K J&K
J&K

J&K

Performance: J&K

  • (GL) Nuuk, Katuaq foyer 3/9/2014 6:30PM
  • (FI) Inari, Saami Cultural Centre Sajos 23/11/2014 4PM

The artist duo J&K (Janne Schäfer, b. 1976, Darmstadt, DE and Kristine Agergaard, b. 1975, Copenhagen, DK) have been working in collaboration since 1999 and are based in Berlin and Copenhagen. They have widely shown their work, most recently at The National Gallery of Denmark and the State Museum of Egyptian Art, Munich. J&K’s artistic practice is fundamentally performative and investigates the mechanisms behind the cultural production of values, believes and identity. The work is often informed through personal and empiric research into ancient, tribal and spiritual cultures and investigates performative mechanisms and aesthetic qualities of rituals in relation to art making. J&K’s practice sets out to question the notion of civilisation and explores liminal realms of human and non-human becoming.

For Greenland Eyes international film festival J&K will produce a new performance piece in close collaboration with a Inuit shaman. The work will bring a piece of “secret” Inuit culture in circulation and will travel along with the festival across all Nordic countries acting as an empowering spell onto Greenland Eyes and as direct link from and to Greenland. J&K intend to open up a space in which living cultural and spiritual traditions and connections across the North can be reflected upon by the visitors of the festival.

www.jk-world.net

Nukaka Coster-Waldau

Nukaka Coster-Waldau

Performance: Nukaka Coster-Waldau

(DK) Cph, Danish Film Institute 18/9/2014 7PM

For Greenland Eyes international film festival Nukaka Coster-Waldau produced a new performance piece which has close connection to her solo piece Strømsteder / Sarfartuut. STRØMSTEDER / SARFARTUUT is a theater production about the feeling of a lack of identity, but also the advantages of merging two very different worlds. The political relationship between Greenland and Denmark is in a very crucial faze. A majority of Greenlanders hope to achieve complete independence from Denmark. But the relationships established between Greenlanders and Danes is a matter of the heart.

THE CHILDREN'S HOME IN UUMMANNAQ

The children's home in Uummannaq

Concert and Performance: The children’s home in Uummannaq

(GL) Nuuk, Katuaq 31/8/2014 7PM
(NO) Oslo, Cinemateket 17/12/2014 8PM


Symposium

Symposium: The Greenlandic Film archive The Greenland Film archive
Symposium: The Greenlandic Film archive

The Greenland Film archive

Symposium

  • (GL) Greenland’s University (auditorium) 29/8/2014 12PM-3PM

The preservation of culture is a key factor in the establishment and nurturing of a society. There has been much talk about creating a film archive for all films recorded in Greenland, both national and international productions, but the archive still does not exist.

Greenland Eyes is inviting key figures, including Charlotte D. Andersen (Groenlandica Head of Department), Niels Pavia Lynge (KNR), Nive Christensen (MA in Art History) a.o. to attend the symposium and discuss how an archive can be created. Who will take responsibility and what should concretely happen next so that the archive can become reality and  preserve Greenland’s film and cultural heritage.

Each participant will deliver an approx. 15min. vision statement  – after which there will be a panel discussion and Q&A from the audience.

Copenhagen university Thoughts on Reconciliation
Copenhagen university

Thoughts on Reconciliation

Symposium

  • (DK) Copenhagen, Copenhagen University (Njalsgade 144, Room 27.0.09) 19/9/2014 1PM-4PM

Thoughts on Reconciliation is a Greenland Eyes symposium at Copenhagen University where Kim Leine, Jessie Kleemann, Iben Mondrup and Aka Hansen will present their thoughts on reconciliation, viewed through the eyes of film and literature.

The symposium is organised in conjunction with Kirsten Thisted, it is free and everybody is welcome to come and listen, get inspired, ask questions or discuss.